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Title:Storybook reading with young children with autism: a parent-implemented communication intervention
Author(s):Akamoglu, Yusuf
Director of Research:Meadan-Kaplansky, Hedda
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Meadan-Kaplansky, Hedda
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Halle, James W.; Woods, Juliann J.
Department / Program:Special Education
Discipline:Special Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):parent-implemented intervention, training and coaching, social-communication skills, naturalistic, storybook reading, intervention
Abstract:Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may experience delays in their ability to speak and communicate with their parents, peers, and others. These children often benefit from evidence-based, parent-implemented communication interventions. One parent was trained and coached to use evidenced-based naturalistic communication teaching strategies (i.e., modeling, mand-model, and time delay) and storybook reading techniques while reading books with her child with ASD. Using a multiple-baseline design across naturalistic teaching strategies, the following three study components were examined, (a) the parent’s use of book reading techniques, (b) the parent’s rate and fidelity (quality) in using of the three naturalistic teaching strategies, and (c) perceptions of the parent and other adults (college students and practitioners) about the social validity of the goals, procedures, and outcomes of the intervention. The entire intervention period lasted 10 weeks. After training and coaching, the parent used the modeling, mand-model, and time delay strategies with higher rates and higher fidelity. The child initiated more communicative acts upon the parent’s use of time delay and increased her number of single-word responses. The parent believed that the intervention strategies supported her and led to improvements in her child’s communication skills. Adult raters evaluated intervention video clips significantly higher than baseline video clips on aspects of parent-child social engagement, child language, and the parent’s ability to facilitate the child’s communication.
Issue Date:2017-09-06
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99172
Rights Information:Copyright 2017 Yusuf Akamoglu
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-03-13
Date Deposited:2017-12


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