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Title:The benefits of getting horizontal
Author(s):Clevenger, John
Director of Research:Beck, Diane
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Beck, Diane
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Simons, Daniel; Gratton, Gabriele; Hummel, John; Irwin, David; Lleras, Alejandro
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Attention
Vision
Visual Field
Attentional Cueing
Horizontal Advantage
Visual Attention
Posner Cueing Task
Object-Based Attention
Symmetry
Abstract:The goal of much research in vision is to better understand the mechanisms of attention. This is often accomplished by using models of attention to predict how the placement of stimuli on a computer screen will affect task difficulty. However, recent research has shown there are asymmetries in visual sensitivity across different locations of the visual field and also that there might be interactions between attention and sensitivity across different locations in the visual field. We discuss the potential significance of these asymmetries for attention research, focusing on the possibility of an attentional advantage for targets appearing horizontal to an invalid exogenous cue. We review previous literature concerning this potential horizontal advantage and then describe seven experiments related to it. Experiments 1 and 2 find an advantage for targets appearing horizontal, rather than diagonal, to an invalid cue in a visual display similar to those used in the classic Posner cueing paradigm. Experiments 3 and 4 provide evidence of an advantage for horizontal targets in a display similar to those used in the object-based attention literature. Experiment 5 attempted to determine whether flanking non-targets are necessary to observe a horizontal advantage, but ended up not providing much information. Experiments 6 and 7 attempted to test between two models of the horizontal advantage and, while perhaps ruling one out, do not provide clean evidence for any. In the end, we conclude that the evidence for the horizontal advantage is strong, though there is still much to learn about.
Issue Date:2017-12-08
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99402
Rights Information:Copyright 2017 John Clevenger
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-03-13
Date Deposited:2017-12


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