Note:This thesis is part of a research project submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of Doctor of Musical Arts in the School of Music. The project also involved the preparation and performance of a recital of music related to the thesis topic.

Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfJordan Vanhemert_Thesis.pdf (7MB)Restricted to U of Illinois
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:A jazz-inspired approach to applied classical saxophone study
Author(s):VanHemert, Jordan
Advisor(s):Kruse, Adam
Contributor(s):Kruse, Adam; McNeill, Charles L.; Pugh, James; Lund, Erik
Department / Program:School of Music
Discipline:Music
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:A.Mus.D. (doctoral)
Subject(s):Jazz
Saxophone
Applied
Improvisation
Composition
Abstract:In 2014, Patricia Shehan Campbell convened the College Music Society’s Task Force on the Undergraduate Music Major (TFUMM). The task force, including lead author Ed Sarath, published a report called Transforming Music Study from its Foundations: A Manifesto for Progressive Change in the Undergraduate Preparation of Music Majors. Among other issues, this report suggested changes to the overall nature of applied study, considered by some to be the backbone of the academic system. The task force’s key claim is that the interpretive performer paradigm purported by most schools of music is no longer sufficient for the changed musical landscape entered by college graduates. The task force has forwarded a model for music study with the three pillars of creativity, diversity, and integration. To accomplish these goals, Sarath envisioned a music school rooted in the principles of integral theory. In this model, the focal point is the composer-improviser-performer paradigm. This paper explores one view of what an applied classical saxophone curriculum might look like in the task force’s vision of an integral school of music. First, I have conducted a survey of applied saxophone professors’ experiences with and use of improvisation in their own applied studios, in order to validate Sarath’s claim that improvisation is mainly experienced in academic studies of jazz and relatively rare in applied classical saxophone study. Finding this to be mostly true, I created a rationale from music education scholarship for a semester-long, jazz-inspired curriculum of applied classical saxophone study.
Issue Date:2018
Publisher:School of Music, College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Genre:Dissertation / Thesis
Type:Text
Image
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99951
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Jordan VanHemert
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-05-18


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics