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Title:Contaminants in Coffee Could be Impacting Your Risk for Cardiovascular Disease
Author(s):Rizvi, Armina F.; Winslow, April N.
Contributor(s):Frasca, Elizabeth
Subject(s):Interdisciplinary Health
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Cardiovascular
Disease
Coffee
Health
Abstract:The purpose of this study is to explore a possible correlation between the consumption of coffee and an individual’s risk with cardiovascular disease. Coffee is an easily accessible stimulant that not many people think of as addictive, however, according to a study done by the Harvard School of Public Health, 54% of Americans over the age of 18 drink ~3.1 cups a day. Coffee/caffeine consumption has been linked to many diseases in epidemiologic studies. However, when looking at it from the atomic level, a contaminant called chlorogenic acid can be found. Recent studies show that this acid interacts with plasma homocysteine levels within the body. Homocysteine is an amino acid and breakdown product of protein metabolism that, when found in high concentrations, is correlated to an increased risk in cardiovascular disease. When in contact, it has been shown that chlorogenic acid raises homocysteine levels in plasma. Albeit causation is difficult to validate, this study observed 107 individuals and a 4 day average of their coffee/caffeine consumption in relation to their current cardiovascular state. A p-value of 0.056 indicated no correlation between these two variables. The individuals were also questioned about their family history of cardiovascular disease. Although nothing significant came from the maternal side, paternal histories of CVD and caffeine consumption had a p-value of ~0.095. While no correlation between the intake of coffee and cardiovascular disease was found, there is hope of future research. Taking a look at the exact contaminants within the coffee and how they interact with cardiovascular disease at a molecular level may be the key to understanding if cutting back on coffee may be the key to cutting back your risk of cardiovascular disease.
Issue Date:2018-04
Genre:Conference Poster
Type:Image
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/99961
Rights Information:Copyright 2018 Armina F. Rizvi
Copyright 2018 April N. Winslow
Date Available in IDEALS:2018-05-22


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