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Title:Testing two models of critical consciousness: an application of sociopolitical development theory and theory of planned behavior
Author(s):Hoang, Tuyet-Mai Ha
Advisor(s):Neville, Helen A.
Department / Program:Educational Psychology
Discipline:Educational Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):social justice, adults, Asian American, White American, theory of planned behavior, sociopolitical development theory, critical consciousness, critical reflection, critical action, critical social analysis, survey, quantitative.
Abstract:Although there is emerging literature exploring the psychological mechanisms associated with critical consciousness (e.g., Watts et al., 2011), we know very little about individuals’ actual activism behaviors. In this study, I built on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and sociopolitical development theory (SPD) to test a model of critical consciousness among a community sample of 179 Asian American and White American adults. Participants completed an online survey about their social justice attitudes, perceived behavioral control, social norms, and social justice intention. They were also invited to sign two online petitions with social justice themes. Path analyses indicated that critical reflection of social inequality, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control were uniquely and positively related to people’s intention to act for social justice causes. Intention to act, in turn, was positively related to the observed social justice behavior while controlling for past behavior. Findings suggested that the theory of planned behavior’s conceptualization was better supported in the White American adult sample, whereas the sociopolitical development theory’s conceptualization was a better fit for the Asian American sample. Limitations of the study and implications for future research were discussed.
Issue Date:2017-07-07
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/98193
Rights Information:Copyright 2017 Tuyet-Mai Hoang
Date Available in IDEALS:2017-09-29
Date Deposited:2017-08


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